Breaking the Rules

Rules for writing, poetry or otherwise, are as plentiful as mosquitoes during a wet July. One such dictum, come down from Moses, it would appear, is never to use clichés. For one, you'll have to remember how to get an accent aigu on the screen. And for two, you'll be considered a lazy writer using …

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Phrases and Clauses and Words, Oh My!

Syntax. It sounds like a levy the government collects on bad habits: smoking, drinking, voting for radical leftwing socialists who care more about people than corporations. But, no. Syntax, accord to Merriam, Webster, and their Indian maiden friend Sacagawea, is "a: the way in which linguistic elements (such as words) are put together to form constituents …

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Inspired by Water: One If By Lake, Two If By Sea

Vacation. For students, its special meaning lies in summer, the granddaddy of all vacations. For adults, however, it's more narrow. Most full-time workers enjoy but 2 to 4 weeks of paid vacation each year. Compared to the nine-week wonder of childhood, slim provisions indeed. Conjuring vacations of your childhood is sure to bring back a …

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This Isn’t Kansas Anymore (And Other Altered-State Lines We’ve Loved)

Cue Ponyboy. Anders Carlson-Wee's new book, The Low Passions, is an outsider. The collection's poetry considers the life of drifters, the homeless, the dumpster divers. And though the speakers are befriended and aided by various strangers, it's really Mother Nature who does her best to shield her feral friends. Too bad her best isn't good …

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Writing About Writers, Reading About Books

Readers like reading about books and the act of reading. Thus, the occasional bestseller about libraries or rare book collectors or, God save us, the randomly-chosen Top 100 Books We Must Read Before Kicking off into the Milky's Way (where you'll be a star, trust me). A corollary is this: Writers like to write about …

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