How Do You Like THEM Apples?

There's nothing quite like the quiet after a storm. Thus my love for the Fifth of July, waking early, hearing only birds and wind through tree and leaf. It makes me feel so, I don't know. Independent of noise. Thank you, God. Yesterday was a passing strange day for this blog. Holidays are slow days …

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So Much for Red Wheelbarrows

Happy Mother's Monday (as the day after Mother's Day isn't called). I hope those of you with moms did yourselves proud by visiting or, more likely, calling or Face-Timing or Skyping or whatever's happening nowadays. Moms are a rare breed. Look at what they put up with (a mirror can't be far). Me, I called …

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How To Get Your New Poetry Manuscript Published in 14 Easy Steps

How to Publish a Book of Poems.  Begin work with 40 to 70 pages of poetry in mind. As you write, be poetic but don't be overly poetic. Keep it simple. Anglo and Saxon over Latin and -ate, every time.  Subject-wise, say the same ole, same ole only in a new way.  Submit to poetry …

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A Sure Sign That Your Poems Might Suck

Kim Addonizio's book Ordinary Genius came out 11 years ago, so the statistics I'm about to cite about poetry readership are dated. The greater point remains valid, however. Let's dive in ipso fasto and meet around the excerpt, shall we?   "Books of poetry will teach you more than your mentor or professor or the …

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Who WAS That Masked Poet?

Poetry journals that read work anonymously are a distinct minority. The $23,496 question is: Why? Shouldn't all editors read work anonymously? Shouldn't all poems be read and judged on their own merits vs. the merits of a well-known (or well-connected) name that might offer a journal some cachet? An anecdote I've shared in the past …

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Growing Reading Fees Cause for Concern

Submittable has a filter called "No Fee" but, for whatever reason, using it does not totally eliminate journals levying fees. And lately, there has been increasing cause for worry on the reading-fee front. It used to be fairly standard that reading fees would be either $2 or, more typically, $3. I wrote about this in …

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Writer / Readers Can Reject Journals, Too

For writers, rejections sting, but let's think about it. As readers, writers are in the position to reject as well. Writers often get rejections from editors that read something like this:"We are sorry we are not accepting your work as it is not a good fit for our journal. This is by no means a …

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Are You My Reader? The Story of a Newborn Poetry Book

With apologies to P.D. Eastman's classic children's book, Are You My Mother?, here's what it might look like for a first poetry collection written by a new-to-the-scene poet. (It happens every day!) A poet worked on his manuscript. The manuscript grew. "Uh-oh," said the poet, "my manuscript will be ready for submission. It will need …

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The Poetry of Questions (and Possible Answers)

Poetry serves many purposes, but one of my favorites is as facilitator of questions and possible answers. Why? Because the answers are often novel concepts. Even better, they're often new questions in answer's clothing. Sure, they might not pass muster with a scientist, but who's worried about scientists when reading poems? Not this guy. The …

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