A Certain, Lovely Ghostliness

There is more poetry in autumn than summer, it would seem. Traveling from the congested highways of an overcrowded Commonwealth to the quiet shorelines of a Maine lake proves as much. Last night we arrived to high winds and whitecaps. This morning I arise to clear, Canadian air, sun, calm. That coupled with the possibility …

Continue reading A Certain, Lovely Ghostliness

Advertisements

The Good-Reading Prince Discovers Royalties

HAMLET: To-read or not to-read? That is the question. OPHELIA: Don't tell me. Goodreads member, right? HAMLET: How did you know? Art thou a mind reader? OPHELIA: A profile reader, you great, fool Dane. 87 books "read" and 8,777 books "to-read," I see. HAMLET: Uh, what are you doing here, anyway? Do you not understand …

Continue reading The Good-Reading Prince Discovers Royalties

Random Thoughts: September Edition

Humidity has made New England its home these past few weeks. The eviction notices don't appear to be working. According to translators Kazuaki Tanahashi and Peter Levitt, the famous Cold Mountain poems appear to have been written by more than one person over time. Is that as shocking as Shakespeare wasn't written by Shakespeare? Not …

Continue reading Random Thoughts: September Edition

Guilt as the Root of All Poetry

Emotions and feelings. They are like the gasoline and oil of that engine we call creativity. Take guilt, for instance. A powerful motivator. A source of bitter reflection. And not the type of thing a fugitive from conscience wants chasing after him. Below are two war-related poems with guilt as their tap root. It's the …

Continue reading Guilt as the Root of All Poetry

Writing Prompts: They Hide in the Wide Open

Traci K. Smith divides her anthology, American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time, into five sections: "The Small Town of My Youth," "Something Shines Out From Every Darkness," "Words Tangled in Debris," "Here, the Sentence Will Be Respected," and "One Singing Thing." Think about it. Each of those section titles would make a great prompt. …

Continue reading Writing Prompts: They Hide in the Wide Open